How to Ship

How to Ship
Choosing the Right Carton

Whenever possible, pack items in specific transit cartons that are double walled and robust.
Packaging strength is preferred as parcels may be stacked on top of each other in storage and during transit.
Local packaging suppliers, stationers and post office shops are a good source of transit cartons and other packaging materials.
Computer Discs, CD’s and DVD’s

When shipping computer discs, CD’s, or DVDs place each one in a protective sleeve, and package items tightly together.When shipping magnetic media like audio or video tapes, place all discs into a strong outer package with cushioning materials. Consider transferring magnetic media onto optical media like DVD or CD ROMS. If this is not possible, package discs in protective sleeves and place in the centre of a larger box.
Size Matters

Choose a box or container that is a little larger that the items to be packed, to allow protective packaging to be used inside the box.
Under filled cartons may collapse.
Overfilled cartons may burst.
This Way Up

Use arrow-up adhesive labels. if you are shipping liquids, semi-liquids, powders or grains to indicate which way the package should be handled. The labels can be bought at stationers, packaging suppliers and some post offices.
It’s a Gift

When sending pre-packaged or pre-wrapped gift items, do not rely on the manufacturer’s display or presentation of packaging. It is recommended, you repack gifts in line with the advice on this page.
Invest in Packaging

Cushioning Counts: worth protecting contents worth pounds.
Use cushioning materials, such as:
Polystyrene beads,
Wood straw,
Bubble wrap,
Shred paper to cushion goods inside the box and stop contents moving during transit.
Addressing

In most instances a properly formatted address label can be printed on your computer printer, If you cannot do this, write the address and other information clearly on the outside of the package. Use large capital letters, black or dark blue ink to improve readability
Large, Flat & Flexible

If you are sending large, flat, flexible items, like maps, plans, posters, etc,, pack them flat between two rigid boards (like hardboard) or roll items and place in postal tubes. Note: Triangular tubes are less likely to be damaged than round tubes.
Sharp Item Precautions

When shipping items like tools, knives and scissors, if possible pack sharp items in manufacturer-supplied protective packaging or in a dedicated case that will protect edges and points. Otherwise, protect edges and points with heavy non-corrugated cardboard, tape securely in place so it will not dislodge.
Make sure the recipient knows of potential sharp items in package to avoid the possibility of injury during unpacking.
Delicate and Fragile

If you are shipping delicate or fragile items place item(s) in the centre of the carton, and make sure they are not in contact with the outside walls at any point
Surround fragile items with adequate cushioning.
If there is more than one item – for example cups and saucers – place cushioning around each item.
‘Fragile’ or ‘Handle with Care’ labels are for information only, and do not confer any magical protective powers!
Sharp Item Precautions

When shipping items like tools, knives and scissors, if possible pack sharp items in manufacturer-supplied protective packaging or in a dedicated case that will protect edges and points. Otherwise, protect edges and points with heavy non-corrugated cardboard, tape securely in place so it will not dislodge.
Make sure the recipient knows of potential sharp items in package to avoid the possibility of injury during unpacking.
What Not to Do

Don’t use fabric bags as packaging.
Don’t completely seal your package; customs officers may need to open it for inspection.
Don’t use rope or string to seal boxes. It can break, and it can catch on other packages and cause damage.
Do not rely on “Fragile” and “Handle with care” labels as a substitute for careful packaging.